Blog Post 13.5: Passages for Wednesday’s Class

Hi everyone,

Here’s a thread for Wednesday’s readings: you should read Milner’s chapter “Voice” in the packet and listen to parts of two podcasts from Reply All: this one up to about 21:00, and this one from about 15:00 until the end. You can listen to these through Spotify mobile, but the podcast’s actual pages have links to some other content that provides useful context and explanation.

By class time Wednesday, you should post in this thread a passage (roughly 2-4 sentences) from one of these sources that you find particularly interesting, surprising, inspiring, problematic, or otherwise significant. Remember to cite the page number for your passage if it’s relevant.

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Blog Post 13: Internet Aesthetics, Internet Politics

Hi everyone,

For our closing discussions this week, we turn to the aesthetic and social possibilities of meme culture. For Monday, we’ll be reading two chapters by Ryan Milner, “Logics: The Fundamentals of Memetic Participation” and “Grammar: Structures for Making Statements and Making Do.” In keeping with our recent focus on the shifting roles of producers and consumers in digital culture, this blog post asks you to do some producing as well as some analyzing — think of this as a little warmup to making some content for the final project, whether or not you’re planning to make memes for that.

Once you’ve read Milner’s work, you should create a meme that illustrates some of the logics and grammar he discusses as central to meme culture and memetic production. There are a number of ways to do this online — lots of apps will allow you to make one on the spot, and there are also sites where you can make image-based or gif-based memes, or you’re free to create one yourself. In your post, you should include a link to your meme, and analyze it through the framework of a specific piece or pieces of Milner’s writing — show how your meme illustrates the ideas and issues he’s discussing. If your meme is something that doesn’t have a specific link, you can also screenshot it and email it to me directly. You should also print out your meme and bring it to class Monday so that we can see and discuss them in small groups as well as on the projector. Happy meme-ing!im-gonna-say-it-you-know-what-im-just-gonna-say-it-making-a-meme-is-a-critical-and-culturally-meanin

Reminder: your response should go in the comments section for this post — click the “Leave a Comment” link at the top of the post. It should be at least 250 words, and is due by midnight on Sunday, April 23rd. If you have any questions, let me know via email.

Blog Post 12: Digital Convergence

Hi everyone,

Our readings for next week take us to another dimension of digital culture: with Jenkins’ reading for Monday, we move from the politics of digital information this past week to cultural issues around digital creation — the question of what happens when digital media gives everyday individuals the opportunity to create and circulate digital content, and how that change in turn transforms the meanings of art, culture, and everyday experience.

jenkinsThis blog post is another open-ended one — you’re free to respond to whatever elements of Jenkins’ writing seem most significant to you. You might consider the social implications of participatory culture for different individuals and groups, or think of examples of how you yourself engage in the kinds of convergence and participatory culture he discusses, or something else entirely. What you pursue is up to you, as long as you ground your discussion in some quotation and close analysis of Jenkins’ writing.

Reminder: your response should go in the comments section for this post — click the “Leave a Comment” link at the top of the post. It should be at least 250 words, and is due by midnight on Sunday, April 16th. If you have any questions, let me know via email.

Blog Post 11: Digital Surveillance and the Politics of Data

Hi all,

Nice discussion of Hasinoff and the gender politics of sexting yesterday. Our readings for Monday take us into a different set of social and political questions around digital culture and life online — together, Madrigal and Cohen offer all sorts of ways to think about how our identities take shape through data, and how corporate access to that data changes the possibilities and limitations of our lives online.

So for this blog post, you should to respond to the questions they raise in whatever way seems most significant to you — what issues do they raise, what concerns do they inspire? You’re free to take your response in whatever direction interests you, as long as you quote and cite some significant material from both articles.

Reminder: your response should go in the comments section for this post — click the “Leave a Comment” link at the top of the post. It should be at least 250 words, and is due by midnight on Sunday, April 9th. If you have any questions, let me know via email.

Blog Post 10.5: Passages for Wednesday’s Class

Hi everyone,

Here’s a thread for Wednesday’s reading by Hasinoff: by class time Wednesday, you should post in this thread a passage (roughly 2-4 sentences) from Hasinoff’s essay that you find particularly interesting, surprising, inspiring, problematic, or otherwise significant. Remember to cite the page number for your passage.

Blog Post 10: Social Media and Digital Identity

Hi everyone,

As we shift from sound to our final section on digital media this coming week, we also shift from thinking about what it means to produce and consume sound in a digital environment to the question of how we all produce and consume information online. Our first author, danah boyd, is the reigning authority on social media and identity, particularly with regard to young people. So for this week’s post, you should engage with a key moment in boyd’s argument in her chapter “Identity” (remember to focus on this chapter for Monday; the Introduction is now optional). What concepts, ideas, issues, claims, etc., seem most important, intriguing, striking, provocative, etc., to you? Because boyd is doing ethnographic work, her writing has a lot of detailed anecdotes and examples, but try to focus instead on a larger claim or assertion she’s making rather than a particular story. Your response to that piece should have two elements:

  • First, quoting and citing that claim, you should do some writing to develop about what’s important or interesting to you about it, much as we’ve been doing with the open-ended posts recently.
  • In addition, you should include in your post an example of digital material that illustrates or speaks to what you see as important or interesting in the passage you’ve chosen. This can take any number of forms: a picture posted online, a status post, tweet, etc. — anywhere where you see someone performing their identity online in a way that relates to boyd’s thinking. If it’s publicly accessible online, you should include a link to it in your post. If it’s not, you should take a screen capture of it and email it to me.

I’m interested to see what everyone comes up with as we head into the digital world — have a good weekend!

Reminder: your response should go in the comments section for this post — click the “Leave a Comment” link at the top of the post. It should be at least 250 words, and is due by midnight on Sunday, April 2nd. If you have any questions, let me know via email.

Blog Post 9.5: Passages for Wednesday, March 29

Hi everyone,

Here’s a thread for Wednesday’s readings: by class time Wednesday, you should post in this thread a passage (roughly 2-4 sentences) from one of the readings for Wednesday that you find particularly interesting, surprising, inspiring, problematic, or otherwise significant. Remember to cite the author and page number for your passage.

Blog Post 9: Sonic Production and Consumption in the Digital Moment

Hi all,

Here’s an open-ended thread for writing and thinking about our material for Monday, Benjamin Franzen and Kembrew McLeod’s film Copyright Criminals and Damon Krukowski’s article on plagiarism, copyright, and “Blurred Lines” (Krukowski’s article is in the packet, but the online version includes several clips that are a useful element of his argument). In keeping with our more open-ended approach to the blog in this second half of the course, you’re free to focus on whatever elements of this material interest you most — you might delve further into the aesthetics and cultural implications of sonic sampling, or respond to some of the different approaches to concepts of ownership and authorship that these texts present, or think about how various different cultural factors (race, gender, economics, etc.) figure into these issues, or any other issues that strike you as interesting or surprising, as long as you ground your discussion in some close analysis of this material.

Reminder: your response should go in the comments section for this post — click the “Leave a Comment” link at the top of the post. It should be at least 250 words, and is due by midnight on Sunday, March 26th. If you have any questions, let me know via email.